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Am J Vet Res. 2008 Oct;69(10):1262-7. doi: 10.2460/ajvr.69.10.1262.

Respiratory alkalosis and primary hypocapnia in Labrador Retrievers participating in field trials in high-ambient-temperature conditions.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether Labrador Retrievers participating in field trials develop respiratory alkalosis and hypocapnia primarily in conditions of high ambient temperatures.

ANIMALS:

16 Labrador Retrievers.

PROCEDURES:

At each of 5 field trials, 5 to 10 dogs were monitored during a test (retrieval of birds over a variable distance on land [1,076 to 2,200 m]; 36 assessments); ambient temperatures ranged from 2.2 degrees to 29.4 degrees C. For each dog, rectal temperature was measured and a venous blood sample was collected in a heparinized syringe within 5 minutes of test completion. Blood samples were analyzed on site for Hct; pH; sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, glucose, lactate, bicarbonate, and total CO2 concentrations; and values of PvO2 and PvCO2. Scatterplots of each variable versus ambient temperature were reviewed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of ambient temperature (< or = 21 degrees C and > 21 degrees C) on each variable.

RESULTS:

Compared with findings at ambient temperatures < or = 21 degrees C, venous blood pH was increased (mean, 7.521 vs 7.349) and PvCO2 was decreased (mean, 17.8 vs 29.3 mm Hg) at temperatures > 21 degrees C; rectal temperature did not differ. Two dogs developed signs of heat stress in 1 test at an ambient temperature of 29 degrees C; their rectal temperatures were higher and PvCO2 values were lower than findings in other dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

When running distances frequently encountered at field trials, healthy Labrador Retrievers developed hyperthermia regardless of ambient temperature. Dogs developed respiratory alkalosis and hypocapnia at ambient temperatures > 21 degrees C.

PMID:
18828680
DOI:
10.2460/ajvr.69.10.1262
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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