Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Cogn Sci. 2008 Feb;12(2):72-9. doi: 10.1016/j.tics.2007.11.004.

Segmentation in the perception and memory of events.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St Louis, MO 63130, USA.

Abstract

People make sense of continuous streams of observed behavior in part by segmenting them into events. Event segmentation seems to be an ongoing component of everyday perception. Events are segmented simultaneously at multiple timescales, and are grouped hierarchically. Activity in brain regions including the posterior temporal and parietal cortex and lateral frontal cortex increases transiently at event boundaries. The parsing of ongoing activity into events is related to the updating of working memory, to the contents of long-term memory, and to the learning of new procedures. Event segmentation might arise as a side effect of an adaptive mechanism that integrates information over the recent past to improve predictions about the near future.

PMID:
18178125
PMCID:
PMC2263140
DOI:
10.1016/j.tics.2007.11.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center