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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Dec;92(12):4753-8. Epub 2007 Sep 18.

Relationship between leptin and C-reactive protein in young Finnish adults.

Author information

1
Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, 20521 Turku, Finland.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations are increased in inflammation, and both have been linked to increased risk for cardiovascular diseases.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of the study was to explore in a population-based sample whether the relation between leptin and CRP is independent of obesity level and whether genetic causes of CRP elevation contribute to leptin levels.

DESIGN:

This was a population-based study including 1862 young adults (971 women; 891 men) aged 24-39 yr.

SETTING:

The study was conducted at five centers in Finland.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Associations between leptin and CRP adjusted for obesity indices, risk factors, genetic variables, and lifestyle variables were measured.

RESULTS:

Women had 3.0-fold higher median concentrations of leptin (12.5 vs. 4.1 ng/ml) and 1.3-fold higher median concentrations of CRP (0.75 vs. 0.56 mg/liter) than men (P < 0.0001 in both comparisons). In univariate analyses, CRP and leptin were significantly intercorrelated (r = 0.47, P < 0.0001 for women; r = 0.46, P < 0.0001 for men). In multiple regression analysis including age, body mass index, waist circumference, insulin, lipids, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, smoking status, and use of oral contraceptives in women, leptin was the main determinant of CRP in men (P < 0.0001) and the second most important determinant in women (P < 0.0001). A Mendelian randomization test based on genetic variants in the CRP gene (five single nucleotide polymorphisms) provided no support for CRP as a causal agent for leptin.

CONCLUSIONS:

Leptin, obesity, and oral contraceptive use in women were the main factors related to CRP. The relation between leptin and CRP was independent of obesity and cardiovascular risk factors.

PMID:
17878255
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2007-0103
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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