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Tissue Cell. 2007 Oct;39(5):335-42. Epub 2007 Aug 17.

The morphology and ultrastructure of the peripheral olfactory organ in newly metamorphosed coral-dwelling gobies, Paragobiodon xanthosomus Bleeker (Gobiidae, Teleostei).

Author information

1
University of the Ryukyus, Tropical Biosphere Research Center (Sesoko Station), Motobu, Okinawa, Japan. arvedlund@speedpost .net

Abstract

We examined the peripheral olfactory organ in newly metamorphosed coral-dwelling gobies, Paragobiodon xanthosomus (SL=5.8mm+/-0.8mm, N=15), by the aid of electron microscopy (scanning and transmission) and light microscopy. Two bilateral olfactory placodes were present in each fish. They were oval-shaped and located medio-ventrally, one in each of the olfactory chambers. Each placode had a continuous cover of cilia. The placode epithelium contained three different types of olfactory receptor neurons: ciliated, microvillous and crypt cells. The latter type was rare. Following a pelagic larval phase, P. xanthosomus settle to the reef and form an obligate association with one species of coral, Seriatopora hystrix. Their well-developed olfactory organs likely enable larvae of P. xanthosomus to detect chemical cues that assist in navigating towards and selecting appropriate coral habitat at settlement. Our findings support past studies showing that the peripheral olfactory organ develops early in coral reef fishes.

PMID:
17707448
DOI:
10.1016/j.tice.2007.06.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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