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Antioxid Redox Signal. 2007 Oct;9(10):1581-90.

High glucose and ketosis (acetoacetate) increases, and chromium niacinate decreases, IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 secretion and oxidative stress in U937 monocytes.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana 71130, USA. sjain@lsuhsc.edu

Abstract

Elevated blood levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) increase insulin resistance and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). There is no previous study that has examined the effect of ketosis and trivalent chromium on IL-6, IL-8, or MCP-1 secretion in any cell type or in human or animal model. The authors examined the hypothesis that ketosis increases and trivalent chromium decreases the levels of cytokines and oxidative stress in diabetes using a U937 monocyte cell culture model. Cells were cultured with control, high glucose (HG), and acetoacetate (AA) in the absence or presence (0.5-10 microM) of CrCl(3), chromium picolinate (Cr-P), or chromium niacinate (Cr-N) at 37 degrees C for 24 h. The data show a significant stimulation of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 secretion and an increase in oxidative stress in cells treated with HG or AA. The effect of HG on cytokine secretion was reduced by Cr-N, and to a lesser extent by CrCl(3) and Cr-P. The effect of HG on oxidative stress was reduced by Cr-N and CrCl 3, but not by Cr-P. Similarly, Cr-N decreased the cytokine secretion in HG + AA-treated cells. Cr-N significantly decreased standard oxidant (H(2)O(2)) induced cytokine secretion, which suggests that reduction of cytokine secretion by Cr-N is in part mediated by its antioxidative effect. In a cell culture model, Cr-N appears to be the most effective form of chromium in inhibiting oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine secretion by monocytes. This study suggests that chromium niacinate supplementation may be useful in reducing vascular inflammation and the risk of CVD in diabetes.

PMID:
17665966
DOI:
10.1089/ars.2007.1577
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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