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World J Surg. 2007 Aug;31(8):1687-92.

Nosocomial infections after peripheral arterial bypass surgery.

Author information

1
Department of Vascular Surgery, Haga Hospital, Sportlaan 600, The Hague, 2566, MJ, The Netherlands. arianneploeg@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hospital-acquired infections account for a substantial increase in morbidity and mortality. This prospective, single-center observational study was conducted to assess the incidence and analyze the risk factors of nosocomial infection after peripheral arterial bypass surgery.

METHODS:

The incidence of nosocomial infections was registered in all patients undergoing peripheral arterial bypass surgery from January 1996 until December 2004, and risk factors for the development of a nosocomial infection were analyzed.

RESULTS:

A total of 67 infections were diagnosed in association with 607 procedures, yielding an infection ratio of 10.0%. Surgical site infection was the most common (55.2%), followed by urinary tract infection (16.4%), pneumonia (14.9%) and bacteremia (10.4%). Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly found isolate in surgical site infections (48.6%) and in bacteremia (42.9%). Age, the use of corticosteroids (p = 0.02), and critical ischemia with tissue loss (p = 0.009) could be identified as risk factors for the development of a nosocomial infection. Blood transfusion was a postoperative risk factor for nosocomial infection (p < .0001). Nosocomial infection was associated with a prolonged hospital stay (p < .0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides a detailed description of the incidence and risk factors regarding nosocomial infection. More detailed studies are necessary to develop strategies to diminish the occurrence of nosocomial infection.

PMID:
17551778
DOI:
10.1007/s00268-007-9130-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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