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Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2007 Mar;41(3):289-92.

Managing psychosis in pregnancy.

Author information

1
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, McMahon's Road, Frankston, Vic. 3199, Australia. Kay.McCauley@med.monash.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This article provides an introduction to the complex issues surrounding the management of women who have a history of psychosis and who become pregnant. Balancing the mental wellbeing of the woman and the safety and wellbeing of the baby is a complex task for both the expectant mother and the health professionals involved in her care.

CLINICAL PICTURE:

Within this article the complexity of the issues will be outlined as a case report of a woman with a history of psychotic related disorders, who was also pregnant.

TREATMENT:

The woman was being case managed by a Mental Health Service in Victoria, Australia, and was included on the National Register of Antipsychotic Medications in Pregnancy Register (NRAMP) recently established at the Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre (APRC).

OUTCOME:

The profile of women with a history of previous mental illness, and who are pregnant, often includes a poor psychosocial history and involvement with child protection agencies with regard to custody of the children. Well meant but poorly coordinated decisions by health professionals result in sub-optimal outcomes for both mother and infant.

CONCLUSION:

There is a need for the exploration of the management and experiences of women who have a history of psychosis and who are pregnant. This case example highlights the complexity of issues surrounding the management of this vulnerable group of women and their babies.

PMID:
17464711
DOI:
10.1080/00048670601172798
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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