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Clin Neurophysiol. 2006 Mar;117(3):538-48. Epub 2006 Feb 7.

A P300-based brain-computer interface: initial tests by ALS patients.

Author information

1
New York State Department of Health, Wadsworth Center, E1001 Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201, USA. esellers@wadsworth.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The current study evaluates the effectiveness of a brain-computer interface (BCI) system that operates by detecting a P300 elicited by one of four randomly presented stimuli (i.e. YES, NO, PASS, END).

METHODS:

Two groups of participants were tested. The first group included three amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients that varied in degree of disability, but all retained the ability to communicate; the second group included three non-ALS controls. Each participant participated in ten experimental sessions during a period of approximately 6 weeks. During each run the participant's task was to attend to one stimulus and disregard the other three. Stimuli were presented auditorily, visually, or in both modes.

RESULTS:

Two of the 3 ALS patient's classification rates were equal to those achieved by the non-ALS participants. Waveform morphology varied as a function of the presentation mode, but not in a similar pattern for each participant.

CONCLUSIONS:

The event-related potentials elicited by the target stimuli could be discriminated from the non-target stimuli for the non-ALS and the ALS groups. Future studies will begin to examine online classification.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The results of offline classification suggest that a P300-based BCI can serve as a non-muscular communication device in both ALS, and non-ALS control groups.

Comment in

PMID:
16461003
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2005.06.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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