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Synapse. 2002 Aug;45(2):134-42.

Dose-dependent effects of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on rates of local cerebral glucose utilization in rat.

Author information

1
Center for the Neurobiological Study of Drug Abuse, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA.

Abstract

Recent reports have demonstrated that Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) stimulates locomotor activity at low doses (<2.5 mg/kg), while higher doses (>2.5 mg/kg) produce decreases in spontaneous activity. Using quantitative 2-[(14)C]deoxyglucose (2-DG) autoradiography, we systematically studied the effects of acute Delta(9)-THC on rates of local cerebral glucose utilization. The first series of experiments was designed to determine if Delta(9)-THC-mediated changes in cerebral metabolism followed a clear dose-response relationship. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either vehicle or Delta(9)-THC (0.25-2.5 mg/kg) and the 2-DG procedure was initiated 15 min following exposure. Administration of 2.5 mg/kg Delta(9)-THC produced significant decreases in cerebral metabolism in most brain regions studied. In contrast, administration of 0.25 mg/kg Delta(9)-THC produced no significant alterations in any brain region studied, while 1.0 mg/kg of Delta(9)-THC produced a restricted pattern of metabolic decreases. Significant decreases in metabolism following 1.0 mg/kg were concentrated in structures subserving limbic and sensory functions. In a second series of experiments, the effects of pretreatment with the cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A (1.0 mg/kg) on Delta(9)-THC-induced changes in functional activity were measured. Pretreatment with SR141716A attenuated the majority of functional changes produced by Delta(9)-THC, suggesting that these effects are primarily mediated by central cannabinoid receptors. Moreover, these findings indicate that the effects of Delta(9)-THC on cerebral metabolism are dose-dependent and that there are regional differences in the metabolic response to acute cannabinoid exposure.

PMID:
12112406
DOI:
10.1002/syn.10089
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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