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Eur J Biochem. 1999 May;262(1):184-90.

Phosphorylation control of cardiac acetyl-CoA carboxylase by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and 5'-AMP activated protein kinase.

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1
Cardiovascular Research and Lipid Lipoprotein Research Groups, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Canada.

Abstract

Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is regarded in liver and adipose tissue to be the rate-limiting enzyme for fatty acid biosynthesis; however, in heart tissue it functions as a regulator of fatty acid oxidation. Because the control of fatty acid oxidation is important to the functioning myocardium, the regulation of ACC is a key issue. Two cardiac isoforms of ACC exist, with molecular masses of 265 kDa and 280 kDa (ACC265 and ACC280). In this study, these proteins were purified from rat heart and used in subsequent phosphorylation and immunoprecipitation experiments. Our results demonstrate that 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is able to phosphorylate both ACC265 and ACC280, resulting in an almost complete loss of ACC activity. Although cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylated only ACC280, a dramatic loss of ACC activity was still observed, suggesting that ACC280 contributes most, if not all, of the total heart ACC activity. ACC280 and ACC265 copurified under all experimental conditions, and purification of heart ACC also resulted in the specific copurification of the alpha2 isoform of the catalytic subunit of AMPK. Although both catalytic subunits of AMPK were expressed in crude heart homogenates, our results suggest that alpha2, and not alpha1, is the dominant isoform of AMPK catalytic subunit regulating ACC in the heart. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that specific antibodies for both ACC265 and ACC280 were able to coimmunoprecipitate the alternate isoform along with the alpha2 isoform of AMPK. Taken together, the immunoprecipitation and the purification studies suggest that the two isoforms of ACC in the heart exist in a heterodimeric structure, and that this structure is tightly associated with the alpha2 subunit of AMPK.

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