Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation in Mult Scler Relat Disord 2016:

Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2016 Jul;8:58-63. doi: 10.1016/j.msard.2016.05.003. Epub 2016 May 2.

The effect of vibrotactile biofeedback of trunk sway on balance control in multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Division of Audiology and Neurootology, Department of ORL, University Hospital Basel, CH-4031 Basel, Switzerland.
2
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Basel, Switzerland; Department of Neurology, Cantonal Hospital Aarau, Switzerland.
3
Department of Neurology, University Hospital Basel, Switzerland.
4
Division of Audiology and Neurootology, Department of ORL, University Hospital Basel, CH-4031 Basel, Switzerland. Electronic address: john.allum@usb.ch.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) suffer from diminished balance control due to slowed sensory conduction and possibly delayed central processing. Vibrotactile biofeedback of trunk sway has been shown to improve balance control in patients with peripheral and central vestibular disorders. Here, the effects of vibrotactile feedback training on trunk sway and a possible carry-over effect was measured in MS patients during stance and gait.

METHODS:

Ten MS patients (mean age 46.8±7.7 years, 40% male) participated in a crossover study in which 7 different stance and gait tasks were trained with and without angle feedback for stance and angular velocity feedback for gait. An assessment sequence of 12 tasks was performed once before and twice after the training sequence. Trunk sway was measured with body-worn gyroscopes. Head mounted vibrotactile biofeedback of trunk sway was provided during one crossover training arm and the following second assessment sequence.

RESULTS:

Biofeedback generally leads to a decrease in sway but an increase in sway angular velocities during some stance tasks compared to training without biofeedback. Biofeedback while walking eyes open resulted in a decreased sway angular velocity. The greatest changes were found in the pitch direction of trunk sway. Effects diminished after biofeedback was removed.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study showed that vibrotactile biofeedback of trunk sway beneficially effects stance and provides significant improvement in gait compared to training without biofeedback in MS patients.

KEYWORDS:

Balance control; Gait; Multiple sclerosis; Stance; Trunk sway; Vibrotactile biofeedback

PMID:
27456875
DOI:
10.1016/j.msard.2016.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center