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Fertil Steril. 2014 Feb;101(2):447-52. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.10.008. Epub 2013 Nov 5.

Influence of vitamin D levels on in vitro fertilization outcomes in donor-recipient cycles.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Center for Women's Reproductive Health, Columbia University, New York, New York. Electronic address: briana.rudick@gmail.com.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Los Angeles, California.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To elucidate the role of vitamin D in reproduction by examining the relationship between recipient vitamin D levels and pregnancy rates in donor-recipient IVF cycles.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Academic tertiary care center.

PATIENT(S):

Ninety-nine recipients of egg donation at University of Southern California Fertility.

INTERVENTION(S):

Serum was collected from egg donor recipients before ET and was tested for vitamin D levels [25(OH)D].

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Clinical pregnancy as defined by sonographic presence of a heartbeat at 7-8 weeks of gestation.

RESULT(S):

In a diverse population of 99 recipients (53% Caucasian, 20% Asian, 16% Hispanic, 7% African American), adjusted clinical pregnancy rates were lower among vitamin D-deficient recipients than among vitamin D-replete recipients (37% vs. 78%). Live-birth rates were 31% among vitamin D-deficient recipients, compared with 59% among vitamin D-replete recipients. There were no differences in adjusted clinical pregnancy and live-birth rates among recipients who were vitamin D deficient [25(OH)D<20 ng/mL] vs. among those who were vitamin D insufficient [20 ng/mL ≤ 25(OH)D<30 ng/mL].

CONCLUSION(S):

Nonreplete vitamin D status [25(OH)D<30 ng/mL] was associated with lower pregnancy rates in recipients of egg donation. Since the oocyte donor-recipient model is able to separate the impact of vitamin D on oocyte vs. endometrium, these data suggest that the effects of vitamin D may be mediated through the endometrium.

KEYWORDS:

25-hydroxyvitamin D; IVF; Vitamin D; endometrium; race; recipients of egg donation

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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