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Neuron. 2018 Feb 21;97(4):925-939.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2018.01.025.

Ultra-Slow Single-Vessel BOLD and CBV-Based fMRI Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Their Correlation with Neuronal Intracellular Calcium Signals.

Author information

1
High-Field Magnetic Resonance Department, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany; Graduate Training Centre of Neuroscience, International Max Planck Research School, University of Tuebingen, 72074 Tuebingen, Germany.
2
High-Field Magnetic Resonance Department, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.
3
MGH/MIT/HMS Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02114, USA.
4
High-Field Magnetic Resonance Department, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany; Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, University of Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.
5
Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA; Section of Neurobiology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.
6
High-Field Magnetic Resonance Department, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany. Electronic address: xin.yu@tuebingen.mpg.de.

Abstract

Functional MRI has been used to map brain activity and functional connectivity based on the strength and temporal coherence of neurovascular-coupled hemodynamic signals. Here, single-vessel fMRI reveals vessel-specific correlation patterns in both rodents and humans. In anesthetized rats, fluctuations in the vessel-specific fMRI signal are correlated with the intracellular calcium signal measured in neighboring neurons. Further, the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal from individual venules and the cerebral-blood-volume signal from individual arterioles show correlations at ultra-slow (<0.1 Hz), anesthetic-modulated rhythms. These data support a model that links neuronal activity to intrinsic oscillations in the cerebral vasculature, with a spatial correlation length of ∼2 mm for arterioles. In complementary data from awake human subjects, the BOLD signal is spatially correlated among sulcus veins and specified intracortical veins of the visual cortex at similar ultra-slow rhythms. These data support the use of fMRI to resolve functional connectivity at the level of single vessels.

KEYWORDS:

BOLD; Calcium; GCaMP; cerebral blood volume; fMRI; functional connectivity; oscillation; resting state; single vessel; vasomotion

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