Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2017 Mar 1;102(3):1001-1008. doi: 10.1210/jc.2016-2871.

Pubertal Progression and Reproductive Hormones in Healthy Girls With Transient Thelarche.

Author information

1
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
2
International Center for Research and Research Training in Endocrine Disruption of Male Reproduction and Child Health, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
3
Asthma and Allergy Clinic, Children's Clinic Randers, DK-8900 Randers, Denmark.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Aalborg University Hospital, DK-9100 Aalborg, Denmark; and.
5
Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

Context:

Detailed evaluation of pubertal progression in girls from longitudinal studies is sparse, and the phenomenon of transient thelarche (TT), defined as the appearance, regression, and subsequent reappearance of breast buds, in healthy girls remains undescribed.

Objective:

To describe TT in terms of pubertal progression, growth, genotypes, and reproductive hormones and to apply new puberty nomograms for breast stages, pubic hair, and menarche.

Design:

A prospective, longitudinal population-based study.

Patients or Other Participants:

Ninety-eight healthy Danish schoolchildren (Caucasian girls) followed longitudinally as part of the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study were included in the evaluation of TT. A total of 1466 girls from 2 cross-sectional studies were included in the creation of the puberty nomograms.

Intervention(s):

None.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

Pubertal progression, specifically thelarche, reproductive hormones, genotype, and growth.

Results:

Twelve of 98 (12%) girls experienced TT. A larger proportion of girls with TT entered puberty by the pubarche pathway (50%) compared with girls with normal progression (15.4%), P = 0.014. Girls with TT progressed through puberty normally when evaluated using puberty nomograms. Reproductive hormones and growth velocity were lower at the first (transient) thelarche than the second (permanent) thelarche.

Conclusion:

TT is a frequent phenomenon that appears to be a peripheral occurrence independent of central puberty. It does not appear to affect subsequent pubertal progression as evaluated by our new puberty nomograms.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01411527.

PMID:
28009526
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2016-2871
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center