Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pharmacopsychiatry. 2005 Jul;38(4):158-60.

Serotonergic effects of smoking are independent from the human serotonin transporter gene promoter polymorphism: evidence from auditory cortical stimulus processing.

Author information

1
Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité University Medicine, Campus Mitte, Berlin, Germany. juergen.gallinat@charite.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cigarette smoking has been associated with mood enhancing properties and modulating effects on serotonin activity. The loudness dependence (LD) of the auditory-evoked N1/P2-component has been related to serotonergic neurotransmission, i. e. the allelic variants in the promoter of the 5-hydroxytryptamine-transporter (5-HTT) gene (SCL6A4). Moreover, smoking behavior has been associated to the 5-HTT-genotype. It was hypothesized that cigarette smoking modulates the LD and this effect was expected to interact with the 5-HTT-genotype.

METHODS:

5-HTT-genotype and LD were determined in 63 healthy smokers and 114 nonsmokers.

RESULTS:

LD was significantly affected by smoking status (p = 0.008) and 5-HTT-genotype (p = 0.045) but not by smoking*genotype-interaction or daily cigarette consumption. Current smokers exhibited a significantly weaker LD compared to nonsmokers. 5-HTT-genotype showed no significant effect on smoking behavior.

DISCUSSION:

The results indicate a higher serotonergic activity in smokers as compared to nonsmokers independent of 5-HTT-genotype. Since former smokers and never smokers showed similar LDs, the serotonin enhancing effect of smoking seems to be a characteristic state, which may contribute to the maintenance of smoking behavior.

PMID:
16025417
DOI:
10.1055/s-2005-871237
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, New York
Loading ...
Support Center