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Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2006 Jul;187(1):103-11. Epub 2006 Apr 22.

Hippocampal glutamate concentration predicts cerebral theta oscillations during cognitive processing.

Author information

1
Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (PUK im SHK), Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Campus Mitte, St. Hedwig Krankenhaus, Turmstrasse 21, 10559 Berlin, Germany. juergen.gallinat@charite.de

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Brain waves reflect collective behavior of neurons and provide insight into distributed network processing. Frontal and hippocampal theta oscillations (4-7 Hz) were linked to cognitive tasks and animal studies have suggested an involvement of glutamatergic neurotransmission in integrative frontal-hippocampal processing. Human evidence for such relationships is lacking.

METHODS:

Here, we studied the associations between glutamate concentrations in the hippocampal region, measured by a 3-T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), and EEG theta activity during an auditory target detection paradigm.

RESULTS:

A robust relationship between hippocampal glutamate and frontal theta activity during stimulus processing was found. Moreover, frontal theta oscillations were related to response speed.

CONCLUSION:

The results suggest a functional coupling between the frontal cortex and hippocampal region during stimulus processing and support the idea of the hippocampus as a neural rhythm generator driven by glutamatergic neurotransmission. These preliminary data show, for the first time, a relationship between in vivo measured glutamate and basic cerebral information processing in humans.

PMID:
16767420
DOI:
10.1007/s00213-006-0397-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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