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Womens Health Issues. 2016 Jul-Aug;26(4):452-9. doi: 10.1016/j.whi.2016.03.010. Epub 2016 May 4.

Pregnant Women's Access to Information About Perinatal Marijuana Use: A Qualitative Study.

Author information

1
Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: marian.jarlenski@pitt.edu.
2
Magee-Womens Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
3
People Designs, Durham, North Carolina.
4
Magee-Womens Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit substance in pregnancy. Little is known about how pregnant women who use marijuana obtain and understand information about perinatal marijuana use. We conducted a qualitative study among pregnant women who had used marijuana to understand their information-seeking patterns and perceptions of usefulness of available information about perinatal marijuana use.

STUDY DESIGN:

We conducted semistructured interviews with 26 pregnant women who were receiving prenatal care and who either disclosed marijuana use or had urine samples testing positive for marijuana. Interviews assessed women's sources of information about risks of perinatal marijuana use and perceptions regarding the usefulness of such information. Interview data were coded independently by two coders who iteratively refined the codes and reviewed transcripts for themes.

RESULTS:

Commonly reported sources of information about perinatal marijuana use included Internet searching and anecdotal experiences or advice from family or friends. Few women reported receiving helpful information from a health care provider or social worker. Women perceived a lack of evidence about harms of perinatal marijuana use, and reported being dissatisfied with the quality of information. Most women said they desired information about the effects of perinatal marijuana use on infant health.

CONCLUSIONS:

Women who used marijuana before or during pregnancy did not find available information about perinatal marijuana use to be useful, and sought more information pertaining to infant health and well-being. Efforts to reduce perinatal marijuana use should focus on addressing this need in both clinical and public health settings.

PMID:
27131908
PMCID:
PMC4958505
DOI:
10.1016/j.whi.2016.03.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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