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Gastroenterology. 2014 May;146(5):1212-21. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2014.01.023. Epub 2014 Jan 28.

Influence of sucrose ingestion on brainstem and hypothalamic intrinsic oscillations in lean and obese women.

Author information

1
Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California; Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, University of California, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: lakilpatrick@mednet.ucla.edu.
2
Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California.
3
Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California; Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, University of California, Los Angeles, California.
4
Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California; Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, University of California, Los Angeles, California; Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center, Los Angeles, California; Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
5
Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, California.
6
Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California; Department of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, University of California, Los Angeles, California; Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center, Los Angeles, California; Department of Psychiatry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

The study of intrinsic fluctuations in the blood oxygen level-dependent signal of functional magnetic resonance imaging can provide insight into the effect of physiologic states on brain processes. In an effort to better understand the brain-gut communication induced by the absorption and metabolism of nutrients in healthy lean and obese individuals, we investigated whether ingestion of nutritive and non-nutritive sweetened beverages differentially engages the hypothalamus and brainstem vagal pathways in lean and obese women.

METHODS:

In a 2-day, double-blind crossover study, 11 lean and 11 obese healthy women underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scans after ingestion of 2 beverages of different sucrose content, but identical sweetness. During scans, subjects rested with eyes closed.

RESULTS:

Blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations demonstrated significantly greater power in the highest frequency band (slow-3: 0.073-0.198 Hz) after ingestion of high-sucrose compared with low-sucrose beverages in the nucleus tractus solitarius for both groups. Obese women had greater connectivity between the right lateral hypothalamus and a reward-related brain region and weaker connectivity with homeostasis and gustatory-related brain regions than lean women.

CONCLUSIONS:

In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we observed sucrose-related changes in oscillatory dynamics of blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations in brainstem and hypothalamus in lean and obese women. The observed frequency changes are consistent with a rapid vagally mediated mechanism due to nutrient absorption, rather than sweet taste receptor activation. These findings provide support for altered interaction between homeostatic and reward networks in obese individuals.

KEYWORDS:

Food Intake; Obesity; Resting State; Satiety

PMID:
24480616
PMCID:
PMC4113508
DOI:
10.1053/j.gastro.2014.01.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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