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Br J Cancer. 2014 Sep 9;111(6):1021-46. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2014.166. Epub 2014 Aug 12.

Guidelines for the use of cell lines in biomedical research.

Author information

1
Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, University of Cambridge, Li Ka Shing Centre, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0RE, UK.
2
CellBank Australia, Children's Medical Research Institute, Locked Bag 23, Wentworthville, New South Wales 2145, Australia.
3
School of Life and Medical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL10 9AB, UK.
4
Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, 44 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY, UK.
5
Institute for Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, 24 Greenwood Drive, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 2HA, UK.
6
Department of Essential Medicines and Health Products, Quality, Safety and Standards Team, World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland.
7
MRC National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA, UK.
8
University College London, 67 Riding House Street, London W1W 7EJ, UK.
9
Cancer Research UK, Angel Building, 407 St John Street, London EC1V 4AD, UK.
10
National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, A Centre of the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, Blanche Lane, South Mimms, Herts EN6 3QG, UK.
11
Culture Collections, Public Health England, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG, UK.

Abstract

Cell-line misidentification and contamination with microorganisms, such as mycoplasma, together with instability, both genetic and phenotypic, are among the problems that continue to affect cell culture. Many of these problems are avoidable with the necessary foresight, and these Guidelines have been prepared to provide those new to the field and others engaged in teaching and instruction with the information necessary to increase their awareness of the problems and to enable them to deal with them effectively. The Guidelines cover areas such as development, acquisition, authentication, cryopreservation, transfer of cell lines between laboratories, microbial contamination, characterisation, instability and misidentification. Advice is also given on complying with current legal and ethical requirements when deriving cell lines from human and animal tissues, the selection and maintenance of equipment and how to deal with problems that may arise.

PMID:
25117809
PMCID:
PMC4453835
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2014.166
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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