Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Head Neck. 2017 Nov;39(11):2329-2349. doi: 10.1002/hed.24883. Epub 2017 Aug 17.

Response assessment after induction chemotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: From physical examination to modern imaging techniques and beyond.

Author information

1
Department of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
3
Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
4
Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh, UK.
5
Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif Cedex, France.
6
Laboratoire de Phonétique et de Phonologie, Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris, France.
7
Department of Oncology, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
8
Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York.
9
University of Udine School of Medicine, Udine, Italy.
10
Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
11
Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain.
12
Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, The Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
13
Fundación de Investigación e Innovación Biosanitaria del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain.
14
Department of Medical Oncology, Antwerp University Hospital, Edegem, Belgium.
15
Coordinator of the International Head and Neck Scientific Group.

Abstract

Significant correlations between the response to induction chemotherapy and success of subsequent radiotherapy have been reported and suggest that the response to induction chemotherapy is able to predict a response to radiotherapy. Therefore, induction chemotherapy may be used to tailor the treatment plan to the individual patient with head and neck cancer: following the planned subsequent (chemo)radiation schedule, planning a radiation dose boost, or reassessing the modality of treatment (eg, upfront surgery). Findings from reported trials suggest room for improvement in clinical response assessment after induction chemotherapy, but an optimal method has yet to be identified. Historically, indices of treatment efficacy in solid tumors have been based solely on systematic assessment of tumor size. However, functional imaging (eg, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) potentially provides an earlier indication of response to treatment than conventional imaging techniques. More advanced imaging techniques are still in an exploratory phase and are not ready for use in clinical practice.

KEYWORDS:

fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET); head and neck squamous cell carcinoma; induction chemotherapy; response assessment

PMID:
28815841
PMCID:
PMC5656833
DOI:
10.1002/hed.24883
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center