Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Feb 21. pii: S0190-9622(19)30329-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2019.02.038. [Epub ahead of print]

Inflammatory dietary pattern and incident psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and atopic dermatitis in women: a cohort study.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada.
2
Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; Department of Dermatology, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI; Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
3
Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI.
4
Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
5
Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
6
Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI; Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada; Women's College Research Institute and Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Women's College Hospital, Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: aaron.drucker@wchospital.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Diet is a modulator of inflammation and may impact inflammatory skin diseases.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the relationship between pro-inflammatory dietary patterns and incident psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and atopic dermatitis (AD).

METHODS:

We conducted cohort studies among women in the Nurses' Health Study II. The empirical dietary inflammatory pattern (EDIP) score was calculated at baseline and every four years. Incident psoriasis, PsA, and AD were assessed by validated self-report. We used multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between EDIP quintiles and risk of psoriasis, PsA and AD.

RESULTS:

We had 85,185 participants in the psoriasis analysis and 63,443 in the AD analysis. There were 1,432 cases of psoriasis, 262 cases of PsA and 403 cases of AD. Pro-inflammatory dietary patterns were not associated with risk of the outcomes in multivariable models (all P-trend > 0.05). HRs comparing the highest to the lowest EDIP quintile were 0.99 (95% CI 0.83 - 1.18) for psoriasis, 1.22 (0.81 - 1.83) for PsA and 0.96 (0.69 - 1.34) for AD.

LIMITATIONS:

Recall and self-report.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings do not support dietary inflammatory potential as a risk factor for psoriasis, PsA or AD.

KEYWORDS:

CRP; EDIP; IL-6; NHS-II; TNF-α; atopic dermatitis; inflammatory diet; psoriasis; psoriatic arthritis

PMID:
30797850
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2019.02.038

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center