Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatrics. 2011 Mar;127(3):494-510. doi: 10.1542/peds.2010-2194. Epub 2011 Feb 14.

Interventions to improve parental communication about sex: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Magee-Womens Hospital, 300 Halket St, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. aakers@mail.magee.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

The relative effectiveness of interventions to improve parental communication with adolescents about sex is not known.

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the effectiveness and methodologic quality of interventions for improving parental communication with adolescents about sex.

METHODS:

We searched 6 databases: OVID/Medline, PsychInfo, ERIC, Cochrane Review, Communication and Mass Media, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature. We included studies published between 1980 and July 2010 in peer-reviewed English-language journals that targeted US parents of adolescents aged 11 to 18 years, used an experimental or quasi-experimental design, included a control group, and had a pretest/posttest design. We abstracted data on multiple communication outcomes defined by the integrative conceptual model (communication frequency, content, skills, intentions, self-efficacy, perceived environmental barriers/facilitators, perceived social norms, attitudes, outcome expectations, knowledge, and beliefs). Methodologic quality was assessed using the 11-item methodologic quality score.

RESULTS:

Twelve studies met inclusion criteria. Compared with controls, parents who participated in these interventions experienced improvements in multiple communication domains including the frequency, quality, intentions, comfort, and self-efficacy for communicating. We noted no effects on parental attitudes toward communicating or the outcomes they expected to occur as a result of communicating. Four studies were of high quality, 7 were of medium quality, and 1 was of lower quality.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our review was limited by the lack of standardized measures for assessing parental communication. Still, interventions for improving parent-adolescent sex communication are well designed and have some targeted effects. Wider dissemination could augment efforts by schools, clinicians, and health educators.

PMID:
21321027
PMCID:
PMC3065139
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2010-2194
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center