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  • The following term was not found in PubMed: Jul;71.
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1989 Jul;71(6):857-62.

Common pitfalls in magnetic resonance imaging of the knee.

Author information

1
Hunington Medical Research Institute, Pasadena, California 91105.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance examinations of 200 knees were studied retrospectively to determine the frequency with which normal ligamentous and tendinous structures mimicked pathological changes in the meniscus or elsewhere in the knee. Although the course of the transverse geniculate ligament simulated a tear of the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus on forty-four (22 per cent) of the sagittal magnetic-resonance scans, no tear of the lateral meniscus was found in the nine patients in this group who had an arthroscopic examination. The normal anatomy of the meniscofemoral ligament varies greatly. The ligament of Humphry, the anterior branch of the meniscofemoral ligament, was visualized on sixty-six (33 per cent) of the magnetic resonance scans. The ligament of Wrisberg, the posterior branch of the meniscofemoral ligament, was identified on sixty-five (32.5 per cent) of the scans. On sagittal images, these ligamentous branches can be mistaken for osteochondral or meniscal fragments. However, a loose body was found in only one of the thirty-two patients who had an arthroscopic examination after the ligament of Humphry or of Wrisberg was seen on the magnetic resonance image. The bursa of the popliteus tendon simulated a tear of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus in fifty-five (27.5 per cent) of the studies, although an actual tear of the posterior horn was found in only two of the eleven patients who had an arthroscopic examination.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
2745483
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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