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Brain Res. 2018 Jan 15;1679:10-18. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2017.11.001. Epub 2017 Nov 4.

Voluntary alcohol intake after noise exposure in adolescent rats: Hippocampal-related behavioral alterations.

Author information

1
Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Medicina, 1ª Cátedra de Farmacología, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
2
Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas-Universidad de Buenos Aires, Centro de Estudios Farmacológicos y Botánicos (CEFyBO, UBA-CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina.
3
Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas-Universidad de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Investigaciones Farmacológicas (ININFA, UBA-CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina.
4
Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Medicina, 1ª Cátedra de Farmacología, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas-Universidad de Buenos Aires, Centro de Estudios Farmacológicos y Botánicos (CEFyBO, UBA-CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: lguelman@fmed.uba.ar.

Abstract

Different physical or chemical agents, such as noise or alcohol, can induce diverse behavioral and biochemical alterations. Considering the high probability of young people to undergo consecutive or simultaneous exposures, the aim of the present work was to investigate in an animal model if noise exposure at early adolescence could induce hippocampal-related behavioral changes that might be modified after alcohol intake. Male Wistar rats (28-days-old) were exposed to noise (95-97 dB, 2 h). Afterwards, animals were allowed to voluntarily drink alcohol (10% ethanol in tap water) for three consecutive days, using the two-bottle free choice paradigm. After that, hippocampal-related memory and anxiety-like behavior tests were performed. Results show that whereas noise-exposed rats presented deficits in habituation memory, those who drank alcohol exhibited impairments in associative memory and anxiety-like behaviors. In contrast, exposure to noise followed by alcohol intake showed increases in exploratory and locomotor activities as well as in anxiety-like behaviors, unlike what was observed using each agent separately. Finally, lower levels of alcohol intake were measured in these animals when compared with those that drank alcohol and were not exposed to noise. Present findings demonstrate that exposure to physical and chemical challenges during early adolescence might induce behavioral alterations that could differ depending on the schedule used, suggesting a high vulnerability of rat developing brain to these socially relevant agents.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Behavior; Development; Noise

PMID:
29113737
DOI:
10.1016/j.brainres.2017.11.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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