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Br J Nutr. 2015 Jun 14;113(11):1732-40. doi: 10.1017/S0007114515000999. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with anaemia among African Americans in a US cohort.

Author information

1
Nutrition and Health Sciences Program, Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Laney Graduate School, Emory University,1462 Clifton Road, Suite 314,Atlanta,GA30322,USA.
2
Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Lipids, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine,Mailstop 1930-001-1AA,Atlanta,GA30322,USA.
3
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine,Mailstop 1490-001-1AA,Atlanta,GA30322,USA.
4
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Medicine,Emory University School of Medicine,Mailstop 4900-001-1AA,Atlanta,GA30322,USA.

Abstract

Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in the US population and is associated with numerous diseases, including those characterised by inflammatory processes. We aimed to investigate the link between vitamin D status and anaemia, hypothesising that lower vitamin D status would be associated with increased odds of anaemia, particularly anaemia with inflammation. A secondary aim was to examine the effects of race in the association between vitamin D status and anaemia. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis in a cohort of generally healthy adults in Atlanta, GA (n 638). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between vitamin D status and anaemia. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) < 50 nmol/l (compared to 25(OH)D ≥ 50 nmol/l) was associated with anaemia in bivariate analysis (OR 2·64, 95% CI 1·43, 4·86). There was significant effect modification by race (P= 0·003), such that blacks with 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/l had increased odds of anaemia (OR 6·42, 95% CI 1·88, 21·99), v. blacks with 25(OH)D ≥ 50 nmol/l, controlling for potential confounders; this association was not apparent in whites. When categorised by subtype of anaemia, blacks with 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/l had significantly increased odds of anaemia with inflammation than blacks with serum 25(OH)D ≥ 50 nmol/l (OR 8·42, 95% CI 1·96, 36·23); there was no association with anaemia without inflammation. In conclusion, serum 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/l was significantly associated with anaemia, particularly anaemia with inflammation, among blacks in a generally healthy adult US cohort.

KEYWORDS:

African Americans; Anaemia; Hb; Hepcidin; Inflammation; Vitamin D

PMID:
25876674
PMCID:
PMC4465993
DOI:
10.1017/S0007114515000999
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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