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J Infus Nurs. 2017 Jan/Feb;40(1):15-25. doi: 10.1097/NAN.0000000000000203.

Vascular Access Specialist Training, Experience, and Practice in the United States: Results From the National PICC1 Survey.

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1
Division of General Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (Drs Chopra, Shader, Vaughn, Saint, and Krein); Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System (Dr Chopra, Ms Kuhn, Mr Ratz, Drs Saint and Krein); Patient Safety Enhancement Program (PSEP), VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (Dr Chopra, Ms Kuhn, Mr Ratz, and Drs Shader, Vaughn, Saint, and Krein). Vineet Chopra, MD, MSc, is an assistant professor of medicine and research scientist at the PSEP of the University of Michigan. Dr. Chopra's research interests focus on improving the use and safety of peripherally inserted central catheters in hospitalized patients. Latoya Kuhn, MPH, is a project manager and research area specialist in the PSEP of the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and the University of Michigan. Ms. Kuhn works closely with Drs. Chopra and Krein on research related to intravenous devices, including PICCs. David Ratz, MS, is a senior analyst and research area specialist in the PSEP of the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and the University of Michigan. Mr. Ratz works closely with Drs. Chopra and Krein on research related to PICCs. Scarlett Shader, BS, is a research assistant currently employed at the PSEP, University of Michigan. Ms. Shader is pursuing a master's degree at the University of Michigan School of Public Health while assisting the PSEP team with various projects including the PICC1 survey. Valerie M. Vaughn, MD, is a fellow in hospital medicine completing her training in health services research at the University of Michigan. Dr. Vaughn's research interests focus on preventing hospital-acquired complications such as catheter-related bloodstream infection and antibiotic-associated adverse events. Sanjay Saint, MD, MPH, is the George Dock Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan, the director of the VA/University of Michigan PSEP, and the chief of medicine at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. Dr. Saint is an internationally recognized patient safety researcher. Sarah L. Krein, PhD, RN, is a research scientist at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and a research professor of internal medicine with an adjunct appointment in the School of Nursing at the University of Michigan. Her research includes patient safety and improving inpatient care delivery.

Abstract

Vascular access specialists are increasingly responsible for insertion and care of peripherally inserted central catheters in the United States. Despite proliferation of the specialty, little is known about the training, practice patterns, and experiences of these clinicians. In partnership with a vascular access and an infusion nursing organization, a Web-based survey of 1698 clinicians was conducted. Substantial variation in practices related to insertion, use of technology, dressing and flushing, and management of complications was observed. Some reported practices were inconsistent with available evidence-based recommendations. Therefore, opportunities to improve patient care and further explore reasons driving such variation exist and should be explored.

PMID:
28030479
DOI:
10.1097/NAN.0000000000000203
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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