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IUBMB Life. 2015 Jul;67(7):482-97. doi: 10.1002/iub.1393. Epub 2015 Jul 15.

Understanding the complexities of Salmonella-host crosstalk as revealed by in vivo model organisms.

Author information

1
Regional Centre for Biotechnology, NCR Biotech Cluster 3rd Milestone, Gurgaon-Faridabad Highway, Village Bhankari, Faridabad, Haryana, India.

Abstract

Foodborne infections caused by non-typhoidal Salmonellae, such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST), pose a major challenge in the developed and developing world. With constant rise of drug-resistant strains, understanding the epidemiology, microbiology, pathogenesis and host-pathogen interactions biology is a mandatory requirement to enable health systems to be ready to combat these illnesses. Patient data from hospitals, at least from some parts of the world, have aided in epidemiological understanding of ST-mediated disease. Most of the other aspects connected to Salmonella-host crosstalk have come from model systems that offer convenience, genetic tractability and low maintenance costs that make them extremely valuable tools. Complex model systems such as the bovine model have helped in understanding key virulence factors needed for infection. Simple systems such as fruit flies and Caenorhabditis elegans have aided in identification of novel virulence factors, host pathways and mechanistic details of interactions. Some of the path-breaking concepts of the field have come from mice model of ST colitis, which allows genetic manipulations as well as high degree of similarity to human counterpart. Together, they are invaluable for correlating in vitro findings of ST-induced disease progression in vivo. The current review is a compilation of various advances of ST-host interactions at cellular and molecular levels that has come from investigations involving model organisms.

KEYWORDS:

NF-κB|AP-1; disease models; genetic models; human molecular disease; microbial genetics; molecular genetics; signalling

PMID:
26179888
DOI:
10.1002/iub.1393
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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