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See 1 citation in Ultraschall Med 2013:

Ultraschall Med. 2013 Aug;34(4):359-67. doi: 10.1055/s-0032-1313136. Epub 2012 Sep 21.

Impact of preoperative bilateral whole breast sonography in patients with invasive lobular carcinoma: results from two medical centers.

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1
Department of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of bilateral whole breast sonography (BWBS) combined with mammography for the detection of additional lesions, as well as index lesions, in patients with invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) and to evaluate the impact of BWBS on surgical treatment and cancer staging strategies.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We retrospectively reviewed mammographic and sonographic records of 97 patients with proven ILCs between November 2002 and November 2009. We evaluated the sensitivity of mammography and BWBS for the detection of additional and index lesions. We compared the impact of BWBS on surgical treatment and breast cancer staging between cases with single index lesions and with BWBS-detected additional lesions and index lesions. We compared the differences in sensitivity, surgical treatment procedures and breast cancer staging between BWBS and MRI confined to the patients underwent MRI.

RESULTS:

The overall sensitivity was 74.4% (93/125 lesions) for mammography and 96.0% (120/125 lesions) for BWBS (p < 0.001). The group with additional lesions detected using US alone exhibited more frequent mastectomy (p = 0.003) and higher N staging (p = 0.051) than did the group with single index lesions. Comparing the BWBS and MRI cases, there were no significant differences in lesion staging, the sensitivity of malignant foci detection (p = 0.074).

CONCLUSION:

BWBS has a higher sensitivity than does mammography for the detection of index and additional ILC. Detection of additional malignancies using BWBS could affect which strategy is chosen for surgical treatment.

PMID:
23023448
DOI:
10.1055/s-0032-1313136
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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