Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Oral Implants Res. 2012 Dec;23(12):1333-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0501.2011.02356.x. Epub 2011 Nov 1.

Tissue integration of collagen-based matrices: an experimental study in mice.

Author information

1
Clinic of Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics and Dental Material Science, Center of Dental Medicine, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To test whether or not tissue integration, biodegradation, and new blood vessel formation in two collagen-based matrices depend on the level of chemical cross-linking.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Two collagen matrices with high (CM1) and low (CM2) levels of chemical cross-linking were randomly implanted in two pouches in 14 athymic nude mice. Three and 6 weeks later, the animals were euthanized. Histologic and histomorphometric measurements were performed on paraffin-embedded sections.

RESULTS:

Both collagen matrices integrated well into the surrounding soft tissues. The level of cross-linking and duration of implantation had an effect on the formation of new blood vessels. More blood vessels (n = in absolute numbers) were found in outer compartments compared to the central compartments of the matrices, reaching 5.6 (CM2) vs. 4.3 (CM1) at 3 weeks, and 5.3 (CM2) vs. 7.3 (CM1) at 6 weeks. Similarly, connective tissue formation increased for both matrices between 3 and 6 weeks, whereas the amount of remaining collagen network gradually decreased over time being more pronounced for CM1 (-50%) compared to CM2 (-15%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The degree of cross-linking was negatively correlated for all outcome measures resulting in improved tissue integration, superior matrix stability and enhanced angiogenic patterns for the less cross-linked collagen matrix (CM2) in this experimental study in mice.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center