Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

J Am Coll Health. 2016 Oct;64(7):545-54. doi: 10.1080/07448481.2016.1192542. Epub 2016 May 25.

The role of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related stigma on HPV vaccine decision-making among college males.

Author information

1
a School of Psychology , University of Ottawa , Ottawa , Ontario , Canada.
2
b Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research , Jewish General Hospital , Montreal , Quebec , Canada.
3
c Department of Psychology , McGill University , Montreal , Quebec , Canada.
4
d Louise Granofsky Psychosocial Oncology Program , Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital , Montreal , Quebec , Canada.
5
e Department of Oncology , McGill University , Montreal , Quebec , Canada.
6
f Department of Psychiatry , McGill University , Montreal , Quebec , Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The goals of the present study are (1) to identify sociodemographic and psychosocial predictors of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related stigma and (2) to examine the relationship between HPV-related stigma in predicting HPV vaccine decision-making among college males.

PARTICIPANTS:

Six hundred and eighty college males aged 18-26 from 3 Canadian universities were recruited from September 2013 to April 2014.

METHODS:

Participants completed a self-report survey assessing HPV-related stigma, psychosocial predictors of HPV-related stigma, and HPV vaccine decision-making. The results were analyzed using variance analyses and linear regressions.

RESULTS:

Ethnicity, province of residence, and perceived severity of HPV were found to significantly influence HPV-related stigma. In addition, HPV-related stigma was higher in those unaware of the availability of the HPV vaccine for males.

CONCLUSIONS:

Promotion efforts should concentrate on Asian minorities and should avoid HPV severity messaging, as these may lead to higher HPV-related stigma, which in turn may act as a barrier to vaccination.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer prevention; HPV; college males; stigma; vaccine decision-making

PMID:
27223873
DOI:
10.1080/07448481.2016.1192542
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center