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Nat Commun. 2019 Oct 30;10(1):4938. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-12908-w.

The oomycete Lagenisma coscinodisci hijacks host alkaloid synthesis during infection of a marine diatom.

Author information

1
Research Group Plankton Community Interaction, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany. mvallet@ice.mpg.de.
2
Research Group Plankton Community Interaction, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany.
3
Research Group Mass Spectrometry/Proteomics, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany.
4
Research Group Olfactory Coding, Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany.
5
Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
6
Department of Biological Sciences, Institute for Ecology, Evolution and Diversity, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
7
Research Group Plankton Community Interaction, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany. georg.pohnert@uni-jena.de.
8
Bioorganic Analytics, Institute for Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany. georg.pohnert@uni-jena.de.
9
Microverse Cluster, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Neugasse 23, 07743, Jena, Germany. georg.pohnert@uni-jena.de.

Erratum in

Abstract

Flagellated oomycetes frequently infect unicellular algae, thus limiting their proliferation. Here we show that the marine oomycete Lagenisma coscinodisci rewires the metabolome of the bloom-forming diatom Coscinodiscus granii, thereby promoting infection success. The algal alkaloids β-carboline and 4-carboxy-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-β-carboline are induced during infection. Single-cell profiling with AP-MALDI-MS and confocal laser scanning microscopy reveals that algal carbolines accumulate in the reproductive form of the parasite. The compounds arrest the algal cell division, increase the infection rate and induce plasmolysis in the host. Our results indicate that the oomycete manipulates the host metabolome to support its own multiplication.

PMID:
31666506
PMCID:
PMC6821873
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-019-12908-w
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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