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J Clin Pharm Ther. 2018 Oct;43(5):606-613. doi: 10.1111/jcpt.12730. Epub 2018 Jun 29.

The knowledge, attitude and practice of health practitioners towards antibiotic prescribing and resistance in developing countries-A systematic review.

Author information

1
PhD Programme "Epidemiology", Braunschweig-Hannover, Germany.
2
Institute for Medical Epidemiology, Biometry, and Informatics (IMEBI), Medical Faculty, Martin -Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale), Germany.
3
German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Hannover, Germany.
4
Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

Abstract

WHAT IS KNOWN AND OBJECTIVE:

Inappropriate antibiotic use is the leading cause of antibiotic resistance especially in developing countries, where patient management is mainly based on the prescription of medicines due to deficiencies in diagnostic procedures. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review of studies on knowledge, attitude and practice of health practitioners towards antibiotic prescribing and resistance in developing countries.

METHODS:

We used MEDLINE and EMBASE to conduct a systematic search for studies. We included papers that focused on health practitioners' knowledge on antibiotic use, local resistance and extent of the antibiotic resistance problem; the health practitioners' confidence in prescribing; commonly used guides; and recommendations to improve antibiotic prescribing. Studies that assessed other indicators were excluded. We assessed the quality of the individual studies using a previously published quality assessment tool. Data were summarized into proportions and means. We registered the review with PROSPERO, registration number CRD42018085664.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION:

We obtained 384 papers, 345 papers after deduplication, 28 relevant papers upon reviewing titles and abstracts, and 15 articles fulfilled our inclusion criteria upon full-text review. Most of the studies were of medium quality (ten), three were of low quality, and two were of high quality. An average of 80.9% of respondents correctly answered questions relating to antibiotic use, whereas 39.6% were aware of the local resistance patterns in their health facilities. Participants stated that antibiotic resistance was a general problem (75.2%), a global problem (84.7%), a national problem (88.0%), a problem in their health facilities (71.9%) and a problem in their daily practice (71.7%). Up to 78.2% of the participants reported that they were very confident or confident in antibiotic prescribing.

WHAT IS NEW AND CONCLUSION:

There was a high reported proportion of participants with an apparently good level of knowledge on antibiotic use and a high level of confidence in antibiotic prescribing, but the reported level of knowledge on local antibiotic resistance was low. The analysis was limited by the low number of studies included, and most of them had a medium quality.

KEYWORDS:

Practice; attitudes; developing countries; health professionals; infectious diseases; knowledge; prescribing

PMID:
29959783
DOI:
10.1111/jcpt.12730
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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