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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2016 Oct;97(10):1745-1752.e7. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2016.03.029. Epub 2016 Apr 29.

Spinal Cord Injury-Functional Index/Assistive Technology Short Forms.

Author information

1
New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Electronic address: mslavin@bu.edu.
2
New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
3
Center on Assessment Research and Translation, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE.
4
Center for Rehabilitation Outcomes Research, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.
5
The Rocky Mountain Regional Spinal Cord Injury System, Craig Hospital, Englewood, CO.
6
Kessler Foundation, West Orange, NJ; Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers, NJ.
7
University of Louisville Medical Center, Louisville, KY.
8
Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA.
9
Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA.
10
New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center, Gaylord Rehabilitation Center, Wallingford, CT.
11
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
12
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Spinal Cord Injury-Functional Index/Assistive Technology (SCI-FI/AT) short forms (SFs) in the domains of basic mobility, self-care, fine motor function, and ambulation based on internal consistency; correlations between SFs and full item banks, and a 10-item computerized adaptive test (CAT) version; magnitude of ceiling and floor effects; and measurement precision across a broad range of function in a sample of adults with spinal cord injury (SCI).

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional cohort study.

SETTING:

Nine national Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems programs.

PARTICIPANTS:

A sample of adults with traumatic SCI (N=460) stratified by level of injury (paraplegia/tetraplegia), completeness of injury, and time since SCI.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

SCI-FI/AT full item bank, 10-item CAT, and SFs (with separate Self-Care and Fine Motor Function SFs for persons with tetraplegia and paraplegia).

RESULTS:

The SCI-FI/AT SFs demonstrated very good internal consistency, group-level reliability, and excellent correlations between SFs and scores based on the CAT version and the total item bank. Ceiling and floor effects are acceptable (except for unacceptable ceiling effects for persons with paraplegia on the Self-Care and Fine Motor Function SFs). The test information functions are excellent across a broad range of functioning typical of persons with paraplegia and tetraplegia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Clinicians and researchers should consider using the SCI-FI/AT SFs to assess functioning with the use of assistive technology when CAT applications are not available.

KEYWORDS:

Activities of daily living; Outcome assessment (health care); Psychometrics; Rehabilitation; Spinal cord injuries

PMID:
27133356
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2016.03.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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