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J Infect Dis. 2018 Aug 14;218(6):911-921. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy249.

The Impact of the National HPV Vaccination Program in England Using the Bivalent HPV Vaccine: Surveillance of Type-Specific HPV in Young Females, 2010-2016.

Author information

1
HIV and STI Department, Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, London, United Kingdom.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
3
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England, London, United Kingdom.
4
Statistics, Modeling, and Economics Department, Public Health England, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Background:

The national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization program was introduced in England in September 2008 using the bivalent vaccine.

Methods:

We collected residual vulva-vaginal swab specimens from 16 to 24-year-old women attending for chlamydia screening between 2010 and 2016 and tested for HPV DNA. We compared changes in type-specific (vaccine and nonvaccine) HPV prevalence over time and association with vaccination coverage. For women with known vaccination status, vaccine effectiveness was estimated.

Results:

HPV DNA testing was completed for 15459 specimens. Prevalence of HPV16/18 decreased between 2010/2011 and 2016 from 8.2% to 1.6% in 16-18 year olds and from 14.0% to 1.6% in 19-21 year olds. Declines were also seen for HPV31/33/45 (6.5% to 0.6% for 16-18 year olds and 8.6% to 2.6% for 19-21 year olds). Vaccine effectiveness for HPV16/18 was 82.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 60.6%-91.8%) and for HPV31/33/45 was 48.7% (95% CI, 20.8%-66.8%). Prevalence of HPV16/18 was compared to findings in 2007-2008 (prevaccination) and to predictions from Public Health England's mathematical model.

Discussion:

Eight years after the introduction of a national HPV vaccination program, substantial declines have occurred in HPV16/18 and HPV31/33/45. The prevalence of other high-risk HPV types has not changed.

PMID:
29917082
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiy249

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