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Int J Mol Sci. 2018 Nov 30;19(12). pii: E3827. doi: 10.3390/ijms19123827.

The Human Microbiota and Obesity: A Literature Systematic Review of In Vivo Models and Technical Approaches.

Author information

1
Laboratorio de Ciencias de los Alimentos, Departamento de Reproducción Humana, Crecimiento y Desarrollo Infantil, Universidad de Guadalajara, CUCS, Guadalajara Jalisco 45180, Mexico. lucrecia.carrera@gmail.com.
2
Laboratorio de Neuroinmunobiología Molecular, Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias Biomédicas (IICB) CUCS, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara Jalisco 45180, Mexico. daniel.ortuno.sahagun@gmail.com.
3
Laboratorio de Investigación y Desarrollo Farmacéutico, Universidad de Guadalajara, CUCEI, Guadalajara Jalisco 44430, Mexico. noel_n_franco@hotmail.com.
4
Laboratorio de Investigación y Desarrollo Farmacéutico, Universidad de Guadalajara, CUCEI, Guadalajara Jalisco 44430, Mexico. jvivero99@hotmail.com.
5
Laboratorio de Investigación y Desarrollo Farmacéutico, Universidad de Guadalajara, CUCEI, Guadalajara Jalisco 44430, Mexico. adelaida.zepeda@academicos.udg.mx.
6
Laboratorio de Investigación y Desarrollo Farmacéutico, Universidad de Guadalajara, CUCEI, Guadalajara Jalisco 44430, Mexico. rocio.lopez@academicos.udg.mx.

Abstract

Obesity is a noncommunicable disease that affects a considerable part of humanity. Recently, it has been recognized that gut microbiota constitutes a fundamental factor in the triggering and development of a large number of pathologies, among which obesity is one of the most related to the processes of dysbiosis. In this review, different animal model approaches, methodologies, and genome scale metabolic databases were revisited to study the gut microbiota and its relationship with metabolic disease. As a data source, PubMed for English-language published material from 1 January 2013, to 22 August 2018, were screened. Some previous studies were included if they were considered classics or highly relevant. Studies that included innovative technical approaches or different in vivo or in vitro models for the study of the relationship between gut microbiota and obesity were selected after a 16-different-keyword exhaustive search. A clear panorama of the current available options for the study of microbiota's influence on obesity, both for animal model election and technical approaches, is presented to the researcher. All the knowledge generated from the study of the microbiota opens the possibility of considering fecal transplantation as a relevant therapeutic alternative for obesity and other metabolic disease treatment.

KEYWORDS:

animal model; human; inflammatory disease; microbiota; obesity

PMID:
30513674
PMCID:
PMC6320813
DOI:
10.3390/ijms19123827
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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