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Curr Opin Immunol. 2016 Dec;43:39-45. doi: 10.1016/j.coi.2016.09.003. Epub 2016 Oct 5.

Targeting B cells in treatment of autoimmunity.

Author information

1
Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO, USA.
2
Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO, USA; Department of Biomedical Research, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA.
3
Centre for Biomedicine, Burnet Institute, Melbourne, Vic., Australia; Department of Immunology, Monash University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia; Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
4
Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO, USA; Department of Biomedical Research, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA. Electronic address: John.Cambier@ucdenver.edu.

Abstract

B cells have emerged as effective targets for therapeutic intervention in autoimmunities in which the ultimate effectors are antibodies, as well as those in which T cells are primary drivers of inflammation. Proof of this principle has come primarily from studies of the efficacy of Rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that depletes B cells, in various autoimmune settings. These successes have inspired efforts to develop more effective anti-CD20s tailored for specific needs, as well as biologicals and small molecules that suppress B cell function without the risks inherent in B cell depletion. Here we review the current status of B cell-targeted therapies for autoimmunity.

PMID:
27718447
PMCID:
PMC5127449
DOI:
10.1016/j.coi.2016.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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