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J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2018 Aug;57(8):615-619.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.jaac.2018.04.012.

Symptom Insight in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Outcomes of an International Aggregated Cross-Sectional Sample.

Author information

1
University of British Columbia and BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: rselles@bcchr.ca.
2
Aarhus University, Denmark.
3
University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
4
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock.
5
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.
6
Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.
7
Griffith University, Queensland, Australia.
8
Yale University, New Haven, CT.
9
St. Joseph's Hospital and McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
10
University of British Columbia and BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Abstract

Insight in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) refers to patients' recognition that their obsessions and compulsions are symptoms rather than necessary or natural thoughts and behaviors.1 It has been estimated that 20% to 45% of youth with OCD exhibit poor or absent insight.2-4 Identified correlates of poor insight include younger age,2,3,5,6 increased OCD severity,2,4,7 impairment,4,7,8 and family accommodation2,4; lower intellectual and adaptive functioning3; and greater depressive symptoms.2,3 Poorer insight has also been associated with reduced response across treatment groups (ie, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor [SSRI], cognitive behavioral therapy [CBT], combined SSRI plus CBT, or pill placebo).9.

PMID:
30071984
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaac.2018.04.012

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