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Acta Paediatr. 2017 Jun;106(6):897-903. doi: 10.1111/apa.13791. Epub 2017 Mar 19.

Survey of neonatal resuscitation practices showed post-training improvements but need to reinforce preterm management, monitoring and adrenaline use.

Author information

1
Division of Neonatology, BCNatal Hospital Sant Joan de Déu-Hospital Clínic, Esplugues de Llobregat (Barcelona), Spain.
2
Maternal and Infant Health and Development Research Network SAMID (RD 12/0026/0002), Health Research Institute Carlos III, Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Barcelona, Spain.
3
Division of Neonatology, Hospital de la Vall d'Hebrón, Barcelona, Spain.
4
Division of Neonatology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain.
5
Health Research Institute Gregorio Marañón (IiSGM), CIBEREHD, Madrid, Spain.
6
Division of Neonatology, Hospital Puerta del Hierro, Majadahonda (Madrid), Spain.
7
Division of Neonatology, Hospital Alvaro Cunqueiro, Beade (Pontevedra), Spain.
8
Biomedical Research Institute University of Santiago de Compostela, La Coruña, Spain.
9
Division of Neonatology, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain.
10
Department of Newborn Research, The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
11
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
12
PIPER - Neonatal Retrieval Services, The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

AIM:

Neonatal resuscitation surveys have showed practice variations between countries, centres and levels of care. We evaluated delivery room practices after a nationwide neonatal resuscitation training programme focused on nontertiary centres.

METHODS:

A 2012 survey sent to all Spanish hospitals handling deliveries covered staff availability and training, equipment and practices in the delivery room and during transfers to neonatal intensive care units. The results from 98 centres that had completed a previous survey in 2007 were analysed by levels of care. Pearson's chi-square test was used to compare the proportions.

RESULTS:

The following had significantly improved in 2012 compared to 2007: the availability of T-piece resuscitators (71.4% vs. 41.8%), plastic wraps (69.4% vs. 31.6%), gas blenders (79.6% vs. 40.8%), pulse oximetry (92.9% vs. 61.2%), use of continuous positive airway pressure (82.7% vs. 43.9%) (all p < 0.01), the availability of instructors (55.6% vs. 83.3%, p < 0.05) and neonatal resuscitation courses (40.8% vs. 79.6%, p < 0.05) in nontertiary centres. In 2012, the use of exhaled carbon dioxide detectors was <7% and endotracheal administration of adrenaline was >90%.

CONCLUSION:

Neonatal resuscitation equipment and practices improved over time, but several aspects needed to be reinforced in training programmes, namely preterm infants' management, monitoring and adrenaline administration.

KEYWORDS:

Delivery room; Neonatal resuscitation; Preterm infant; Survey; Training

PMID:
28218962
DOI:
10.1111/apa.13791
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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