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Acta Otolaryngol. 2015;135(11):1152-9. doi: 10.3109/00016489.2015.1062548. Epub 2015 Jul 22.

Surgical treatment is effective in severe cases of exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction: A follow-up study.

Author information

1
a 1 Department of Surgical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery , Uppsala, Sweden.
2
b 2 Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy , Uppsala, Sweden.
3
c 3 Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research , Uppsala, Sweden.
4
d 4 Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University , Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

CONCLUSIONS:

Surgery is an effective treatment in severe cases of supraglottic exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (E-ILO). Conservatively treated subjects and subjects tested negative for E-ILO, who still experience breathing problems 1-3 years after diagnosis, tend to adjust their physical activity to a greater extent than surgically treated subjects.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate how symptoms and level of physical activity change over time in patients with E-ILO who have undergone surgery, patients with E-ILO treated conservatively and patients who tested negative for laryngeal obstruction at continuous laryngoscopy exercise-test (CLE-test).

METHODS:

Patients referred for exercise-induced breathing difficulties answered questionnaires at diagnostic CLE-test and at follow-up. Questions regarded exercise-induced breathing problems, current physical activity level, and medical history of asthma and perennial allergy.

RESULTS:

Out of 84 invited subjects, 59 (70%) answered both questionnaires. Surgically treated subjects had less breathing problems at follow-up compared with conservatively treated subjects and subjects who tested negative (p < 0.001). None of the surgically treated subjects were less physically active or had changed sport due to exercise-induced dyspnoea, whereas 41.7% of the conservatively treated subjects had made such adjustments (p < 0.001).

KEYWORDS:

E-ILO; Laryngoplasty; exercice-induced dyspnoea; physical activity; vocal cord dysfunction

PMID:
26200564
DOI:
10.3109/00016489.2015.1062548
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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