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J Invest Dermatol. 2014 Nov;134(11):2806-2813. doi: 10.1038/jid.2014.223. Epub 2014 May 20.

Sun and ski holidays improve vitamin D status, but are associated with high levels of DNA damage.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatological Research, University of Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: bibi.petersen@regionh.dk.
2
Department of Dermatological Research, University of Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
3
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
4
Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, Huddinge, Sweden.
5
St John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's Hospital, King's College London, London, UK.
6
Unit of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

Skin cancer is caused by solar UVR, which is also essential for vitamin D production. DNA damage (thymine dimers: T-T dimers) and vitamin D (25(OH)D) synthesis are both initiated by solar UVB. We aimed to investigate the simultaneous adverse and beneficial effects of solar UVB exposure in holidaymakers. Sun-seekers and skiers (n=71) were observed over 6 days through on-site monitoring, personal diary entries, and recording of personal UVB exposure doses with electronic dosimeters. Urine and blood samples were analyzed for T-T dimers and 25(OH)D, respectively. The volunteers had a statistically significant increase in vitamin D. There were strong associations between UVB exposure and post-holiday levels of T-T dimers and vitamin D, as well as between post-holiday T-T dimers and vitamin D. We conclude that UVB-induced vitamin D synthesis is associated with considerable DNA damage in the skin. These data, on two major health predictors, provide a basis for further field studies that may result in better understanding of the risks and benefits of "real life" solar exposure. However, vitamin D status can be improved more safely through the use of vitamin D dietary supplements.

PMID:
24844860
DOI:
10.1038/jid.2014.223
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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