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  • The following term was not found in PubMed: Fasciopathy%3A.
Biomed Res Int. 2016;2016:9415827. doi: 10.1155/2016/9415827. Epub 2016 Jul 5.

Success and Recurrence Rate after Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Plantar Fasciopathy: A Retrospective Study.

Author information

1
Sports and Exercise Medicine Clinic, Asklipiou 17, 54639 Thessaloniki, Greece; National Track and Field Centre, Sports Medicine Clinic of S.E.G.A.S., Thessaloniki, Greece; European Sports Care, 68 Harley Street, London W1G 7HE, UK; Centre for Sports & Exercise Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, Bancroft Road, London E1 4DG, UK.
2
King's College London Medical School, London SE1 1UL, UK.
3
Sports and Exercise Medicine Clinic, Asklipiou 17, 54639 Thessaloniki, Greece; National Track and Field Centre, Sports Medicine Clinic of S.E.G.A.S., Thessaloniki, Greece.
4
Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, P.O. Box 29222, Doha, Qatar; Faculty of Sport Science and Physical Education, University of Thessaly, Karyes, 42100 Trikala, Greece.
5
European Sportscare Network (ESN), Zentrum für Sportorthopädie, Borsigstrasse 2, 65205 Wiesbaden-Nordenstadt, Germany.
6
European Sports Care, 68 Harley Street, London W1G 7HE, UK; European Sportscare Network (ESN), Zentrum für Sportorthopädie, Borsigstrasse 2, 65205 Wiesbaden-Nordenstadt, Germany; Institute for Sport and Sport Sciences, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau, Schwarzwaldstraße 175, 79117 Freiburg, Germany.
7
European Sports Care, 68 Harley Street, London W1G 7HE, UK; Centre for Sports & Exercise Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, Bancroft Road, London E1 4DG, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

The exploration of an individualised protocol of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) for plantar fasciopathy, assessing success rates and the recurrence rate over a 1-year period after treatment, is not yet identified in literature.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Between 2006 and 2013, 68 patients (78 heels) were assessed for plantar fasciopathy. An individualised rESWT treatment protocol was applied and retrospectively analysed. Heels were analysed for mean number of shock wave impulses, mean pressure, and mean frequency applied. Significant mean pain reductions were assessed through Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) after 1-month, 3-month, and 1-year follow-up. Success rates were estimated as the percentage of patients having more than 60% VAS pain decrease at each follow-up. 1-year recurrence rate was estimated. The mean VAS score before treatment at 6.9 reduced to 3.6, 1 month after the last session, and to 2.2 and 0.9, after 3 months and 1 year, respectively. Success rates were estimated at 19% (1 month), 70% (3 months), and 98% (1 year). The 1-year recurrence rate was 8%. Moderate positive Spearman's rho correlation (r = 0.462, p < 0.001) was found between pretreatment pain duration and the total number of rESWT sessions applied.

CONCLUSIONS:

Individualised rESWT protocol constitutes a suitable treatment for patients undergoing rESWT for plantar fasciitis.

PMID:
27478843
PMCID:
PMC4949339
DOI:
10.1155/2016/9415827
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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