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J Radiat Res. 2017 Jan;58(1):155-163. doi: 10.1093/jrr/rrw089. Epub 2016 Sep 26.

Spine Metastasis Practice Patterns among Korean, Chinese, and Japanese Radiation Oncologists: A Multinational Online Survey Study.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, #50 Irwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710, Korea.
2
Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, #50 Irwon-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710, Korea hee.ro.park@samsung.com.
3
Department of Medical Device Management and Research, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea.
4
Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China.
5
Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, China.
6
Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
7
Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.
8
Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Gunma University, Gunma, Japan.
9
Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

This online survey of practising radiation oncologists from Korea, China and Japan was conducted to investigate the current practices in radiotherapy (RT) for spine metastasis and to compare these practices across the three countries. The questionnaire included nine general information questions and two clinical scenarios (representing 'typical' and 'good' prognosis spine metastasis), with seven questions for each scenario. An anonymous web-based survey using Google Docs® was undertaken from 2 September 2014 to 9 April 2015. A total of 54 Korean, 107 Chinese and 104 Japanese radiation oncologists participated in the study. The first scenario involved a typical case of spine metastasis (~25% expected 1-year survival rate), and the preferred fractionation scheme was 10 fractions of 3 Gy, though the pattern was slightly different in each country. The second scenario involved a good prognosis case (>50% expected 1-year survival rate), and 10 fractions of 3 Gy was the preferred practice in all three countries (however, use of a larger fraction dose with a smaller fraction number was more common in Korea). A more conformal RT technique was more prominent in China and Korea, especially for patients with a good prognosis. Avoidance of reirradiation was notable in China. In summary, a preference for multiple fractionation in RT for spine metastasis was observed in the majority of Korean, Chinese and Japanese radiation oncologists, although there were slight differences in practice preferences, especially for patients with a favorable prognosis.

KEYWORDS:

data collection; metastasis; neoplasm; physician's practice patterns; radiotherapy; spine

PMID:
27672099
PMCID:
PMC5321193
DOI:
10.1093/jrr/rrw089
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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