Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Infection. 2016 Dec;44(6):739-746. Epub 2016 Jul 11.

Intensified colonisation screening according to the recommendations of the German Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infectious Diseases Prevention (KRINKO): identification and containment of a Serratia marcescens outbreak in the neonatal intensive care unit, Jena, Germany, 2013-2014.

Author information

1
Unit Neonatology, Department of Paediatrics, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany.
2
Institute for Medical Microbiology, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany.
3
Nosocomial Pathogens and Antibiotic Resistance, Robert Koch Institute, Wernigerode, Germany.
4
Institute of Medical Statistics, Computer Sciences and Documentation, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany.
5
Center for Infectious Diseases and Infection Control, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740, Jena, Germany.
6
Center for Infectious Diseases and Infection Control, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740, Jena, Germany. mathias.pletz@med.uni-jena.de.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

In 2013, the German Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infectious Disease Prevention (KRINKO) stated that extending weekly colonisation screening from very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (<1500 g) to all patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) might be useful.

METHODS:

After implementing this recommendation, we detected a previously unnoticed cluster of Serratia marcescens. Strains were typed by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE).

RESULTS:

Over 6 months, 19 out of 159 infants acquired S. marcescens. Twelve of the nineteen patients with S. marcescens were non-VLBW infants, and they were colonised significantly earlier than were VLBW infants (median 17 vs. 28 days; p < 0.01). Molecular typing revealed a polyclonal outbreak with multiple strain types leading to one or two transmissions each and a dominating outbreak strains being involved in an explosive outbreak involving eight neonates.

CONCLUSION:

The revised KRINKO recommendation may help identify unnoticed outbreaks. Colonised non-VLBW patients may be an underestimated source of S. marcescens.

KEYWORDS:

Clonal transmission; Neonatology; Outbreak; Screening

PMID:
27401691
DOI:
10.1007/s15010-016-0922-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center