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Semin Perinatol. 2017 Dec;41(8):445-451. doi: 10.1053/j.semperi.2017.08.002. Epub 2017 Sep 19.

Predicting preterm birth: Cervical length and fetal fibronectin.

Author information

1
Feinberg School of Medicine, Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern University, 250 E. Superior St, Suite 05-2175, Chicago, IL. Electronic address: Moeun.son@northwestern.edu.
2
Feinberg School of Medicine, Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern University, 250 E. Superior St, Suite 05-2175, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

Spontaneous preterm birth remains the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide, and accounts for a significant global health burden. Several obstetric strategies to screen for spontaneous preterm delivery, such as cervical length and fetal fibronectin measurement, have emerged. However, the effectiveness of these strategies relies on their ability to accurately predict those pregnancies at increased risk for spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB). Transvaginal cervical shortening is predictive of preterm birth and when coupled with appropriate preterm birth prevention strategies, has been associated with reductions in SPTB in asymptomatic women with a singleton gestation. The use of qualitative fetal fibronectin may be useful in conjunction with cervical length assessment in women with acute preterm labor symptoms, but data supporting its clinical utility remain limited. As both cervical length and qualitative fetal fibronectin have limited capacity to predict preterm birth, further studies are needed to investigate other potential screening modalities.

KEYWORDS:

Cervical length; Fetal fibronectin; Spontaneous preterm birth

PMID:
28935263
PMCID:
PMC6033518
DOI:
10.1053/j.semperi.2017.08.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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