Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

Brain Lang. 2011 Apr;117(1):28-33. doi: 10.1016/j.bandl.2010.11.004. Epub 2011 Feb 18.

Semantic dementia and persisting Wernicke's aphasia: linguistic and anatomical profiles.

Author information

1
Memory Aging Center, UCSF Department of Neurology, San Francisco, CA, United States. jogar@memory.ucsf.edu

Abstract

Few studies have directly compared the clinical and anatomical characteristics of patients with progressive aphasia to those of patients with aphasia caused by stroke. In the current study we examined fluent forms of aphasia in these two groups, specifically semantic dementia (SD) and persisting Wernicke's aphasia (WA) due to stroke. We compared 10 patients with SD to 10 age- and education-matched patients with WA in three language domains: language comprehension (single words and sentences), spontaneous speech and visual semantics. Neuroanatomical involvement was analyzed using disease-specific image analysis techniques: voxel-based morphometry (VBM) for patients with SD and overlays of lesion digitized lesion reconstructions in patients with WA. Patients with SD and WA were both impaired on tasks that involved visual semantics, but patients with SD were less impaired in spontaneous speech and sentence comprehension. The anatomical findings showed that different regions were most affected in the two disorders: the left anterior temporal lobe in SD and the left posterior middle temporal gyrus in chronic WA. This study highlights that the two syndromes classically associated with language comprehension deficits in aphasia due to stroke and neurodegenerative disease are clinically distinct, most likely due to distinct distributions of damage in the temporal lobe.

PMID:
21315437
PMCID:
PMC3160783
DOI:
10.1016/j.bandl.2010.11.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center