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J Sci Med Sport. 2018 May;21(5):442-446. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.09.591. Epub 2017 Oct 6.

SCAT3 changes from baseline and associations with X2 Patch measured head acceleration in amateur Australian football players.

Author information

1
School of Psychological Sciences, Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, Monash University, Australia; Monash-Epworth Rehabilitation Research Centre, Australia. Electronic address: catherine.willmott@monash.edu.
2
Australian Collaboration for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention, Federation University, Australia; Monash University Accident Research Centre, Monash University, Australia.
3
National Trauma Research Institute, Australia; Department of Surgery, Monash University, Australia.
4
National Trauma Research Institute, Australia; Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Australia; Emergency & Trauma Centre, The Alfred Hospital, Australia.
5
School of Psychological Sciences, Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, Monash University, Australia; Monash-Epworth Rehabilitation Research Centre, Australia.
6
National Trauma Research Institute, Australia; Emergency & Trauma Centre, The Alfred Hospital, Australia.
7
Monash Institute of Medical Engineering, Monash University, Australia; Department of Neurosurgery, The Alfred Hospital, Australia; Department of Surgery, Monash University, Australia; Department of Surgery, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of The Health Sciences (USUHS), USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate changes from baseline on SCAT3 as a result of football game exposure, and association with X2 Patch measured head acceleration events in amateur Australian footballers.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort.

METHODS:

Peak linear acceleration (PLA) of the head (>10 g) was measured by wearable head acceleration sensor X2 Biosystems X-Patch in male (n=34) and female (n=19) Australian footballers. SCAT3 was administered at baseline (B) and post-game (PG).

RESULTS:

1394 head acceleration events (HEA) >10 g were measured. Mean and median HEA PLA were recorded as 15.2 g (SD=9.2, range=10.0-115.8) and 12.4 g (IQR=11.0-15.6) respectively. No significant difference in median HEA PLA (g) was detected across gender (p=0.55), however, more HEAs were recorded in males (p=0.03). A greater number (p=0.004) and severity (p<0.001) of symptoms were reported PG than at B. No significant association between number of HEA or median PLA, and SCAT3 change scores (p>0.05 for all), was identified for either gender.

CONCLUSIONS:

Increase in symptom severity post game was not associated with X2 measured HEA. Males sustained more HEA, however HEA PLA magnitude did not differ across gender. Further work on the validation of head acceleration sensors is required and their role in sports concussion research and medical management.

KEYWORDS:

Australian; Biomechanics; Football; General; Head impact; Head injuries/concussion

PMID:
29037609
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2017.09.591
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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