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Biochim Biophys Acta. 2016 Jan;1862(1):82-92. doi: 10.1016/j.bbadis.2015.10.019. Epub 2015 Oct 24.

S-adenosylhomocysteine induces inflammation through NFkB: A possible role for EZH2 in endothelial cell activation.

Author information

1
Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Research Institute for Medicines (iMed.ULisboa), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
2
Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry and Metabolism, Department of General Pediatrics, Adolescent Medicine and Neonatology, University Medical Centre Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
4
Research Institute for Medicines (iMed.ULisboa), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
5
Research Institute for Medicines (iMed.ULisboa), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal; Department of Biochemistry and Human Biology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
6
Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: dhandy@rics.bwh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) can induce endothelial dysfunction and activation, contributing to atherogenesis; however, its role in the activation of the inflammatory mediator NFkB has not been explored. Our aim was to determine the role of NFkB in SAH-induced activation of endothelial cells. Furthermore, we examined whether SAH, as a potent inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases, suppresses the function of EZH2 methyltransferase to contribute to SAH-induced endothelial cell activation. We found that excess SAH increases the expression of adhesion molecules and cytokines in human coronary artery endothelial cells. Importantly, this up-regulation was suppressed in cells expressing a dominant negative form of the NFkB inhibitor, IkB. Moreover, SAH accumulation triggers the activation of both the canonical and non-canonical NFkB pathways, decreases EZH2, and reduces histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation. EZH2 knockdown recapitulated the effects of excess SAH on endothelial activation, i.e., it induced NFkB activation and the subsequent up-regulation of adhesion molecules and cytokines. Our findings suggest that suppression of the epigenetic regulator EZH2 by excess SAH may contribute to NFkB activation and the consequent vascular inflammatory response. These studies unveil new targets of SAH regulation, demonstrating that EZH2 suppression and NFkB activation mediated by SAH accumulation may contribute to its adverse effects in the vasculature.

KEYWORDS:

Adhesion molecules; EZH2; Endothelial activation; Methylation; NFkB; S-adenosylhomocysteine

PMID:
26506125
PMCID:
PMC4674364
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbadis.2015.10.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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