Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

Neuropsychopharmacology. 2015 Jul;40(8):1940-6. doi: 10.1038/npp.2015.43. Epub 2015 Feb 9.

Reward Responsiveness Varies by Smoking Status in Women with a History of Major Depressive Disorder.

Author information

1
1] McLean Imaging Center, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA, USA [2] Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
2
1] Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA [2] Depression Clinical Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
3
1] Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA [2] Center for Depression, Anxiety and Stress Research, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA, USA.
4
Center for Depression, Anxiety and Stress Research, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA, USA.
5
Depression Clinical Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
6
1] McLean Imaging Center, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA, USA [2] Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA [3] Depression Clinical Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA [4] Center for Depression, Anxiety and Stress Research, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Belmont, MA, USA.
7
1] Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA [2] Center for Addiction Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Major depressive disorder (MDD) and nicotine dependence are highly comorbid, with studies showing that ~50% of individuals with MDD smoke. The link between these disorders persists even after the clinical symptoms of depression subside, as indicated by high levels of nicotine dependence among individuals with remitted depression (rMDD). Recent evidence indicates that individuals with rMDD show blunted responses to reward as measured by a probabilistic reward task (PRT), which assesses the ability to modify behavior as a function of reward history. Given nicotine's ability to enhance reward responsiveness, individuals with rMDD might smoke to address this persistent reward deficit. However, it is unclear whether smokers with rMDD show enhanced reward responsiveness relative to rMDD individuals who do not smoke. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated reward responsiveness on the PRT in four groups (N=198): individuals with and without rMDD who were or were not nicotine dependent. As hypothesized, rMDD nonsmokers had lower reward responsiveness relative to both control nonsmokers and rMDD smokers; conversely, smokers with rMDD showed behavioral patterns comparable to those without a history of depression. Given nicotine's ability to enhance reward sensitivity, it is possible that nicotine normalizes the otherwise blunted reward responsiveness in individuals with rMDD. Therapies aimed at enhancing this reward-based deficit may be beneficial in the treatment of both nicotine dependence and MDD.

PMID:
25662839
PMCID:
PMC4839517
DOI:
10.1038/npp.2015.43
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center