Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

Br J Gen Pract. 2018 May;68(670):e323-e332. doi: 10.3399/bjgp18X695813. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

Responsibility for follow-up during the diagnostic process in primary care: a secondary analysis of International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership data.

Author information

1
Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
2
Research Unit for General Practice, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
3
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Växjö, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is unclear to what extent primary care practitioners (PCPs) should retain responsibility for follow-up to ensure that patients are monitored until their symptoms or signs are explained.

AIM:

To explore the extent to which PCPs retain responsibility for diagnostic follow-up actions across 11 international jurisdictions.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

A secondary analysis of survey data from the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership.

METHOD:

The authors counted the proportion of 2879 PCPs who retained responsibility for each area of follow-up (appointments, test results, and non-attenders). Proportions were weighted by the sample size of each jurisdiction. Pooled estimates were obtained using a random-effects model, and UK estimates were compared with non-UK ones. Free-text responses were analysed to contextualise quantitative findings using a modified grounded theory approach.

RESULTS:

PCPs varied in their retention of responsibility for follow-up from 19% to 97% across jurisdictions and area of follow-up. Test reconciliation was inadequate in most jurisdictions. Significantly fewer UK PCPs retained responsibility for test result communication (73% versus 85%, P = 0.04) and non-attender follow-up (78% versus 93%, P<0.01) compared with non-UK PCPs. PCPs have developed bespoke, inconsistent solutions to follow-up. In cases of greatest concern, 'double safety netting' is described, where both patient and PCP retain responsibility.

CONCLUSION:

The degree to which PCPs retain responsibility for follow-up is dependent on their level of concern about the patient and their primary care system's properties. Integrated systems to support follow-up are at present underutilised, and research into their development, uptake, and effectiveness seems warranted.

KEYWORDS:

cancer; diagnosis; diagnostic errors; diagnostic safety; general practice; primary care; safety netting

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center