Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

Pediatr Dent. 2015 May-Jun;37(3):294-9.

Progress in Early Childhood Caries and Opportunities in Research, Policy, and Clinical Management.

Author information

1
Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Mass. USA.
2
Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, at the University of Maryland, College Park, Md., USA.
3
Division of Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Craniofacial Science, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Conn., USA.
4
Section of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif., USA.
5
School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Conn., USA.
6
School of Public Health, at the University of Maryland, College Park, Md., USA.
7
Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology, College of Dentistry, New York University, New York, N.Y., USA.
8
Developmental Biology (Pediatric Dentistry), Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Department of Dentistry, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, USA.
9
Department of Odontology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
10
Division of Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Md., USA. ntinanoff@umaryland.edu.

Abstract

The 2014 Early Childhood Caries Conference encompassed evidence-based reviews on the state of the science regarding early childhood carries (ECC) epidemiology, etiology, prevention, and disease management. The purpose of this paper was to discuss the work presented at the conference and identify opportunities in research, policy, and clinical management that may improve early childhood caries outcomes and lower costs of care. While great progress has been made since the 1997 ECC Conference, there remains a paucity of high-quality evidence from randomized controlled trials on what are the most effective means to prevent and manage ECC. Analyses of studies indicate that some approaches, such as chlorhexidine, iodine, and remineralizing agents, have not shown consistent findings in preventing ECC. However, evidence exists to yield recommendations in some areas. There are useful risk assessment indicators to identify preschool children at risk for caries. Fluoridated toothpaste and fluoride varnish currently are the most effective chemotherapeutic strategies to prevent ECC. Motivational interviewing, a form of patient-centered counseling, is effective for motivating oral health behaviors and shows promise for reducing caries. Additionally, evidence is emerging that shows the value of chronic disease management approaches and integrating ECC oral health care within medical care settings. Recommendations for future directions in ECC research and policy were also key outcomes of the conference.

PMID:
26063559
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Ingenta plc
Loading ...
Support Center